What does BDSM Mean and How to Start Doing It?

How to Start Doing It?

It’s not every day that we encounter extremely atypical sexual preferences, is it? Sure, there’s a chance that we’ll meet gay, bisexual and even transgender folk in our circle of friends, but what are the chances that you’ll come across a fetishist, a shemale or a BDSM enthusiast unless you regularly hang out at the same places as these groups of people. Furthermore, how many of us can give an answer to the question “what does BDSM mean?”

Not many, that’s for sure. Still, we live in a much more tolerant and open-minded society where people consider new options much more frequently that a couple of decades ago. With that being said, we’re dedicating this “BDSM for Beginners” course for all of you who want to start practicing BDSM regularly but don’t know where to begin.

Sexology Says…

Before we even start discussing some of the best ways for a complete layman to start doing BDSM, we need to understand the true BDSM, sadism and bondage meaning, and learn what does BDSM stand for in the first place.

In order to do that, we need to take a sexology standpoint. While many people believe BDSM is “short for something” in and of itself, in reality, it’s actually a combination of multiple acronyms that represent different aspects of this complex sexual preference.

BDSM consists of BD, DS and SM. There stand for bondage and discipline, domination and submission, and sadism and masochism (or simply sadomasochism), respectively.

All of these aspects are interconnected in one way or another, but they all have something unique to them. Bondage is the act of tying your partner with ropes, chains and other props for purposes of increased sexual stimulation, for starters. Discipline refers to verbal abuse and giving out orders as part of the roleplay, while domination represents an augmented form of discipline – it also involves physical pain. Submission is the complete opposite of domination.

Sadism is basically domination without discipline – there are no insults, only the infliction of pain upon your partner, while masochism refers to causing pain to yourself as a way to achieve sexual pleasure.

Where Do I Start?

We know we gave pretty blunt explanation on the different aspects of BDSM, but we did that in order for you to have a better insight as to how much variety BDSM actually offers.

Although there are some people who literally practice BDSM in all of its glory, we recommend that you pick one that suits you best. If you like to be the dominant one in bed, submission and masochism are probably not for you – instead, it’s probably best that you start with discipline and work your way to domination or sadism if you feel like it.

No matter which BDSM aspect you pick, make sure that your partner is up for it. Just like regular sex, BDSM has to be consensual – otherwise it’s considered as torture, abuse, and maybe even assault and battery.

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